Hear the Noise That Moves So Soft and Low
James Vincent McMorrow

hear the noise that moves so soft and low - james vincent mcmorrow

suren seneviratne for dent de man // ss 14 lookbook

expecttheunexpectedtoday:

expecttheunexpectedtoday
Cactus Chair / Franklin Park Conservatory / Columbus, Ohio by 17 year old Ohio photographer Spencer Williams

expecttheunexpectedtoday:

expecttheunexpectedtoday

Cactus Chair / Franklin Park Conservatory / Columbus, Ohio
by 17 year old Ohio photographer Spencer Williams

kyllmiself:

oafmeal:

holy keith 

I AM IN LOVE.

kyllmiself:

oafmeal:

holy keith 

I AM IN LOVE.

turecepcja:

Topographically-accurate LED light -“The moon.” by Nosigner 

roomonfiredesign:

Brion Cemetary in San Vito d’Altivole near Treviso, Italy is considered Italian architect Carlo Scarpa’s most important and complex work. “I consider this work, if you permit me, to be rather good and one which will get better over time. I have tried to put some poetic imagination into it, though not in order to create poetic architecture but to make a certain kind of architecture that could emanate a sense of formal poetry. The place for the dead is a garden. I wanted to show some ways in which you could approach death in a social and civic way; and further what meaning there was in death, in the ephemerality of life other than these shoe-boxes.” Scarpa died in 1978, in a construction site accident. He is buried in this cemetery in a standing position in a hidden spot within the interstitial space where the walls of the old and new cemeteries meet.

humansofnewyork:

"I’ve been a deep believer my whole life. 18 years as a Southern Baptist. More than 40 years as a mainline Protestant. I’m an ordained pastor. But it’s just stopped making sense to me. You see people doing terrible things in the name of religion, and you think: ‘Those people believe just as strongly as I do. They’re just as convinced as I am.’ And it just doesn’t make sense anymore. It doesn’t make sense to believe in a God that dabbles in people’s lives. If a plane crashes, and one person survives, everyone thanks God. They say: ‘God had a purpose for that person. God saved her for a reason!’ Do we not realize how cruel that is? Do we not realize how cruel it is to say that if God had a purpose for that person, he also had a purpose in killing everyone else on that plane? And a purpose in starving millions of children? A purpose in slavery and genocide? For every time you say that there’s a purpose behind one person’s success, you invalidate billions of people. You say there is a purpose to their suffering. And that’s just cruel."

humansofnewyork:

"I’ve been a deep believer my whole life. 18 years as a Southern Baptist. More than 40 years as a mainline Protestant. I’m an ordained pastor. But it’s just stopped making sense to me. You see people doing terrible things in the name of religion, and you think: ‘Those people believe just as strongly as I do. They’re just as convinced as I am.’ And it just doesn’t make sense anymore. It doesn’t make sense to believe in a God that dabbles in people’s lives. If a plane crashes, and one person survives, everyone thanks God. They say: ‘God had a purpose for that person. God saved her for a reason!’ Do we not realize how cruel that is? Do we not realize how cruel it is to say that if God had a purpose for that person, he also had a purpose in killing everyone else on that plane? And a purpose in starving millions of children? A purpose in slavery and genocide? For every time you say that there’s a purpose behind one person’s success, you invalidate billions of people. You say there is a purpose to their suffering. And that’s just cruel."